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Lung diseases

Calcified granulomas in the lungs.

03/24/2006

Question:

What are calcified granulomas and how to they get into a person`s lungs? Once in the lungs, will they exist there forever or can they be removed or reduced by medical treatments? And if they are considered to be benign, could they ever turn malignant? Thank you.

Answer:

Calcified granulomas are scars within the lung that usually arise from sites of prior infections.  They are commonly caused by fungal infections such as histoplasmosis which is endemic to the Ohio River Valley and coccidiomycosis which is endemic to areas of California.  Calcified granulomas are usually benign and do not cause any problems in the lung.  They are not treated in any way.  Very rarely, scars or fibrotic areas may turn into cancers, so called scar carcinomas.  These are usually detected by serial X-rays that note a change in the size, shape, or contour of a lesion.  It would be good to review your xray with your physician and discuss these questions with him/her.

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Response by:

Ralph   Panos, MD Ralph Panos, MD
Associate Professor
College of Medicine
University of Cincinnati